Long way round

Where else would I find it?

littlelimpstiff14u2:

http://littlelimpstiff14u2.tumblr.com/

The Extraordinary Art of Nicola Verlato

Italian born artist Nicola Verlato creates paintings deeply rooted in the Renaissance painting tradition. He began drawing and painting at an early age, and begged his parents to teach him how to paint like the great Italian masters. When he was 9 a client of his family’s winery mentioned Fra Terenzio, a monk who taught people how to paint in his studio in the Franciscan monastery a few miles away. He spent 5 summers there, learning the techniques that would turn his future works into stunning explorations in lighting, skin tone, poses, and texture. .Txt  Verlato daringly combines techniques and skills borrowed from the old masters with themes more pop culture than Raphael. Regardless of the stew of pop-culture sign-posts found in his work, ranging from Disney to rock ‘n’ roll, to movie stars, comics and pornography, his central argument — that nothing evokes an emotional reaction more than the human form — is borne out by his highly dramatic tableaus. Verlato’s engrossing paintings manifest ample technical skill, but more importantly, they draw us in and ask us to consider the meaning of it all.Txt
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(Source: crossconnectmag)

moma:

Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs is less than two weeks away! Do you have your timed tickets yet? 

[Henri Matisse. The Sheaf (La Gerbe). 1953. Maquette for ceramic (realized 1953). Gouache on paper, cut and pasted, on paper, mounted on canvas. 115 ¾ x 137 ¾” (294 x 350 cm). Collection University of California, Los Angeles. Hammer Museum. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Sidney F. Brody. © 2014 Succession H. Matisse / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

moma:

Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs is less than two weeks away! Do you have your timed tickets yet? 

[Henri Matisse. The Sheaf (La Gerbe). 1953. Maquette for ceramic (realized 1953). Gouache on paper, cut and pasted, on paper, mounted on canvas. 115 ¾ x 137 ¾” (294 x 350 cm). Collection University of California, Los Angeles. Hammer Museum. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Sidney F. Brody. © 2014 Succession H. Matisse / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

It used to be that economic expansions improved the incomes of the bottom 90 percent more than the top 10 percent.

But starting with the “Reagan” recovery of 1982 to 1990, the benefits of economic growth during expansions have gone mostly to the top 10 percent.

Since the current recovery began in 2009, all economic gains have gone to the top 10 percent. The bottom 90 percent has lost ground.

We’re in the first economic upturn on record in which 90 percent of Americans have become worse off.

Robert Reich writes Why the Economy is Still Failing Most Americans (via holygoddamnshitballs)

We are an efficient society. Those efficiencies have gone mostly to the top 1% by the greedy CEO-class using stagnant overall wages, low minimum wages, and outsourced labor en masse. Our society has squeezed every last drop out of the working classes.

A broad recovery is forbidden by the CEO-class.

(via liberalsarecool)

(via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

In the old days, NFL owners were rich men who accepted the risk of losing money as the cost of doing business. Thanks to the popularity of the game, the NFL and its owners—with the collusion of politicians—have created what amounts to a risk-free business environment. According to Long’s data, a dozen teams received more public money than they needed to build their facilities. Rather than going into debt, they turned a profit.

The perfect example: Seven of every ten dollars spent to build CenturyLink Field in Seattle came from the taxpayers of Washington State, $390 million total. The owner, Paul Allen, pays the state $1 million per year in “rent” and collects most of the $200 million generated. If you are wondering how to become, like Allen, one of the richest humans on earth, negotiating such a lease would be a good start.

In New Orleans, taxpayers have bankrolled roughly a billion dollars to build then renovate the Superdome, which we are now supposed to call the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. Guess who gets nearly all the revenues generated by Saints games played in this building? If you guessed all those hard-working stiffs who paid a billion dollars, you would be wrong. If you guessed billionaire owner Tom Benson, you would be right. He also receives $6 million per annum from the state as an “inducement payment” to keep him from moving the team.

That’s the same amount Cowboys owner Jerry Jones would pay each year in property taxes to Arlington, Texas, where his fancy new stadium is located. Except that Jones doesn’t pay property taxes because, like many of his fellow plutocrats, he’s cut a sweetheart deal with the local authorities.

Why Being a Football Fan Is Indefensible (via kenyatta)

Public funding of stadiums and arenas makes me so goddamn angry.

(via wilwheaton)

The Ramp and the Dome, man.

Or even better, an MLB example: the Cards.

(via dressed-all-over)

We paid for it. Why can’t we get into it for free?

Money over people.

(via eviltessmacher)

(via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

Zion

Zion